Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Hacienda Jaral de Berrios - Guanajuato Mexico - Interior Shots

Sometime in the last ten  years, I was lucky enough to have gone to Hacienda Jaral de Barrios, Hacienda La Quemada, Hacienda San Jose and Hacienda Trancas, many times.  Without thinking about it from a time span perspective, I took photos.  Today I'm so glad I did.

After visiting Jaral de Berrios last week, it was apparent that the demise of the interior has been ongoing during the time span since my last visit.  Here are photos taken about ten years ago of interior wall and ceiling decorations.  They are quite spectacular.
 All of these photos were taken on the second floor.  The above one, if I remember correctly, was taken at the front of the house and had natural light from windows.
 The stenciling and painted walls were exquisite irregardless of some decay.
 This fresco surrounding by broken tile is exceptional.  Try clicking on the photos to see if they will
enlarge.  I'm not sure if they will or won't.
 This was a canopy of silk that covered a large ballroom ceiling.  Exceptionally beautiful.
 The rotunda in the stairwell leading to the second floor not only had a skylight, but also windows looking out over the lands in the back of the building.  Lovely.
 This mural was a surprise and quite well executed.  The colors were still intense.
This photo is one of my all time favorites that I have ever taken.  All the textures of the white silk wall paper peeling from the wall against the exterior stone wall and the black wrought iron.  There was no ceiling left in this room.  I don't know what shape it is in now.  I did not go to the second floor on this trip.

Can't you just imagine the opulence of this house at one point.  It is written that at some time in history, the owner of this house at the time, was one of the richest men in the world!  It is totally  obvious from these photos......

7 comments:

Barbara Lane said...

Yes they enlarge! And they take my breath away. Oh I envy you having seen this. Oh my. Exquisite, all. Thank you so very much for sharing.

living.boondockingmexico said...

I wonder why they aren't being preserved? What a shame. Beautiful paintings.

jennifer rose said...

Mexican haciendas suffer the same reputation as Estadounidense antebellum plantations.

Peter Kouwenhoven said...

The same can be seen in Italy where entire villages lay abandoned. Oh to just win the lottery...

Shannon said...

That is absolutely amazing Barbara. Thanks so much for sharing! Do you have any idea how much might be left in tact now? Or if it is possible to get to see it? From the photos you can visualize what the house must have been like when people were in residence there. I would really love to see it if there is anything left.

Babs said...

Shannon, since it was the luck of the draw that the guard came to the hacienda while we were there and I was able to schmooze him to let us in, I can't guarantee that you would be able to get in. All the decorative rooms are mostly on the second floor which is up a huge two flights of stairs, so I didn't even attempt to go up this time.
Since I didn't go to the second floor, I'll have to ask those who went on this trip if these wall adornments are still there. I'll let you know.

Barbara, Chris, Peter, Jennifer, there are many haciendas that have been maintained and can be visited throughout Mexico. Do your research or get the huge book on the Haciendas of Mexico to admire and explore the possibilities. Going into public haciendas is not expensive at all but are usually closed on Mondays as are all the museums in Mexico.

It does make me so sad to see such architectural gems in such disrepair.....

postcardsfromsanantonio said...

Beautiful!