Monday, June 09, 2014

Nature's gift to us.

Yesterday, after things had settled down a bit and the colonia event was in a siesta mode, my neighbor Rick and I sat out on the flagstone patio to share photos of the pre-dawn and dawn events in the street by the houses.

Rick has an I-Pad or Tablet, or whatever it is, that he took many photos and videoed the mornings cacophony of noise.  (That is an understatement).  The video is wonderful, as not only can you see the flares of the fireworks over my roof terrace, but you can also hear the tuba band.  It makes me laugh out loud when hearing it and then when hearing it again on the video.

It seems that there are five or six musicians. I use that term loosely.  And none of them appear, in their earnestness, to be playing the same music.  It's a delight to witness.

After we looked at the smoke-filled and fireworks-filled photos against the sunrise, Rick showed me the photo above.  It was taken from the roof terrace of the guest house.  I was enthralled.

I've enjoyed the jacaranda tree from my roof terrace.  However from there all you can see is the canopy of the tree, not the whole thing and not from a slight distance.  The magnificence of it is beautiful beyond my expectations.

I asked if he would email it to me, which he did.  I then decided to share this beautiful sight with you.  The whole tree, when covered with monarchs in March is breathtaking.  Although, as far as I know, there were none in this photo, it is still breathtaking to me.

I always revel in the fact that nature, which is free for our enjoyment, can touch our hearts and senses in such a profound way, IF we take time to notice.

11 comments:

Retired Teacher said...

I was rather surprised that here in Valencia, Spain, there are a large number of jacaranda trees throughout the city. They are past their peak, but still have some blooms. Also very common here are oleander bushes which are in full bloom right now.

Babs said...

Wow, Bill, that is fascinating. Maybe that's how jacarandas got here, from the Spaniards.

I'm doing battle right now with cutter ants who have decided that the poisonous leaves on oleanders are not poisonous for them! They just keep stripping the plants to pad their underground nests. Aaargh. I love oleanders. They are such a treasure in the South. The entire causeway to Galveston Island has them about two stories high.

Sissy said...

The tree is gorgeous Wish they grew in my area. I've heard nature doesn't 'do blue'. Ah, I beg to differ. May I have permission to save a copy of your picture? So eye-catching; I want to show it to another.

Droelma said...

In my Colonia here in the capital we have Jacaranda trees everywhere and about 6 weeks ago everything was bluish-purple from the millions of flowers. About ten years ago there was a proposal to up-root the trees, because their roots do a lot of damage to the side walks. Some of them have become un-passable and pretty much all are very uneven; quite dangerous for an older woman like I lacking good eye sight at night. Luckily the neighbors voted for the trees and many of them are now several floors high and I have a neighbor friend, who cut blossoms from her balcony. Jacaranda trees are actually indigenous to Central America and I assume that the Spanish introduced them to Spain. I remember quite a few big Jacarandas in Malaga and Velez-Malaga .

Pat Walker said...

That is fabulous!!

Charles said...

Stunning! I love the primaveras and poincianas down here as well...more of the beautiful colors of Mexico...

Babs said...

Sissy, feel free to "save the tree photo". Although I can't suggest how to do it. Ha.

Babs said...

Droelma, Yes the jacaranda root systems are incredible. Mine is surrounded by a field stone surround which is now broken in two or three places from the roots.

But, the idea of taking down or moving them would be horrible. This one has probably grown 10 ft in the 14 years I've been here. I'll have to look back for early photos!

Babs said...

Thanks Pat WAlker and Charles. I too love those plants Charles.
If you look at the photo and see the blotch of red on the ground at the edge of the house? That is bourganvilla blooming from a plant that I planted maybe eight years ago that is now about 6 ft high. I love being surrounded by flowers.

Marks Hinton said...

What an interesting bit on the dirt sellers. I remember seeing burros with bags of dirt last summer while living in your compound but not having a clue as to why anyone would pull a burro carrying dirt. Now I know. Thanks

Hope all is well. Hope to see you soon.

Marks

Babs said...

Thanks for your message Marks. Hope to see ya'll soon as well!